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Australian Mom Shamed for Packing Raisins for Her Child’s Lunch

Australian Mom Shamed for Packing Raisins for Her Child’s Lunch


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The snack didn’t measure up to the school’s standards

The pack of raisins was deemed “unacceptable” because it had high sugar content.

Teaching children how to eat healthy at a young age is important, and one school in Australia has taken it upon itself by putting in place a “Healthy Eating Policy” that encourages parents to provide nutritious snacks for their children. However, one mom was warned by the school about her choice of snack — and it wasn’t a sugar-loaded candy bar, but a pack of raisins.

The note to the mom was posted in the Oh So Busy Mum Facebook group by mom blogger Cheree Lawrence. According to Lawrence, the “offending” mom, who chose to remain anonymous, originally shared the note in a Facebook group called Lunchbox Ideas Australia.

“Please help us to encourage nutritious eating habits in our children,” the note said. "The sultanas packed for your child today [are] unacceptable due to [their] high sugar content.”

The note claimed that “acceptable” items that abide by the school’s policy include yogurt, fresh or dried fruit and vegetables, and cheese, among other snacks.

To find out how healthy your kids’ “healthy” snacks are, click here.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


I was lunchbox shamed at a Japanese preschool so I learnt to make the perfect bento

There are few parenting shames greater than being told the food you are giving your children is not up to scratch.

My third child started preschool while I was living in Tokyo — the only non-Japanese kid in the class — and I learnt the hard way that making a school lunch in Japan is not only about a full stomach, or even nutrition. It is an artform.

One afternoon when I went to pick up my little son, the teacher called me aside. All the staff at the school had noted a problem with the food I had packed that day, he said.

"Sandwiches," the teacher told me, "are not appropriate because they are not healthy."

He took out his phone and up flashed a picture of my son's school lunch. Together we peered at the image: two wholemeal vegemite sandwiches (the jar had been carefully, lovingly, carried to Tokyo from Sydney), a banana, a cheese stick, slices of capsicum and carrot and a home-made muffin.

I had to admit that it looked very yellow.

I told him this was a pretty typical lunch for a young child where I came from — so what should I do differently?

The teacher promptly produced more photographs on his phone. "These," he told me by way of explanation, "are some of the lunchboxes that other children brought with them today."

I scrolled past elaborate combinations of food featuring balls of rice that had been crafted to look like Japanese cartoon characters — Hello Kitty, Rilakkuma, Doraemon, Pikachu.

These rice sculptures with sweet faces cut from seaweed and cheese were nestled into an elaborate landscape of food. There were eggs in special shapes, sausages sliced to look like an octopus, "flowers" made from carrot or ham and toothpicks with tiny ladybugs on the end that held together artfully rolled pieces of omelette. Cherry tomatoes and florets of broccoli filled out the gaps.

I thought the teacher was joking: it could not be possible that any parent would produce such a thing for a pre-schooler's lunch. I waited for him to burst out laughing — gotcha!

But the teacher's face was stern.

I had just been introduced to "chara-ben", the character lunch box, and to be honest the learning curve looked steep.


Watch the video: Σπιτικές Σταφίδες: Αποξηραίνουμε Σταφίδες στον Ήλιο (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Duval

    Yes too, thank you

  2. Judy

    But is there a similar analogue?

  3. Dikasa

    I apologise, but, in my opinion, you are not right. I suggest it to discuss. Write to me in PM, we will talk.

  4. Cerin

    Here is a Christmas tree stick



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